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[한국변호사, 미국변호사, 일리노이 변호사, 세무사 이재욱]
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ATTORNEY [ licensed to practice in KOREA, U.S.A., ILLINOIS ] LEE, JAE WOOK
∗ [FOR AlienS - ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEGAL SERVICES in Counseling, Application and LITIGATION & TRIAL IN COURTS and TRIBUNALS in KOREA]
INTERNATIONAL DIVORCE, CIVIL, REAL ESTATE, PERSONAL INJURY, DAMAGES, TRAFFIC ACCIDENT, FRAUD, PENAL LAW, CRIMINAL TRIAL, FELONY, GUILTY PLEA, LEASE, RENTAL LAW, IMMIGRATION, INVESTMENT, TAX, INCORPORATION, TRADE, CONTRACT, DISPUTE IN CORPORATION, GOVERNMENT TREATMENT, REFUGEE, REMOVAL, VISA, PERMANENT RESIDENCE, CITIZENSHIP]
For more information for the services Attorney LEE provide for the Aliens who want for legal services in Korea, Please do not hesitate to click the below MENU link for "SERVICES FOR AlienS".

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[Category]
VISA IN KOREA


[Title]
Visa policy of South Korea
Start →


South Korea entry stamp

South Korea exit stamp
South Korea maintains a visa waiver agreement list and a designated visa-free entry list with countries not included on those lists requiring a visa to enter the country.[1][2] In addition, foreigners wishing to engage in certain activities such as diplomatic work, gainful employment, study or residence must apply for the appropriate visa prior to engaging in that activity in country.[3][4]

Contents  [hide]
1        Visa policy map
2        Visa-free entry
2.1        Special policy
3        Non-ordinary passports
4        Transit
4.1        Transit Tourism Program
4.2        30-day visa exemption
5        Nationality evaluation
6        Jeju Island
7        APEC Business Travel Card
8        South Korean visas
8.1        Working Holiday Visa (H-1)
8.2        Overseas Study (D-2) visa
8.3        Corporate Investment (D-8) visa
8.4        Foreign Language teaching (E-2) visa
8.5        Residency (F-2) visa
9        Visitor statistics
10        See also
11        References
12        External links
Visa policy map[edit]

Map of countries with visa-free entry or visa waiver agreements with South Korea.
Visa-free entry[edit]
Holders of passports issued by the following 117 jurisdictions do not require a visa to enter South Korea for up to the limit listed below:[1][2]

180 days

Canada
90 days

European Union European Union citizens (except Cyprus and Portugal)1 2
Antigua and Barbuda
Australia
Bahamas
Barbados
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Costa Rica
Dominica
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
El Salvador
Grenada
Guatemala
Haiti
Hong Kong
Iceland
Israel
Jamaica
Japan
Kuwait
Liberia
Liechtenstein
Macau
Malaysia
Mexico
Morocco
New Zealand
Nicaragua
Norway
Panama
Peru
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
Serbia
Singapore
Suriname
  Switzerland
Taiwan
Thailand
Trinidad and Tobago
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
United States of America
Uruguay
Venezuela
1 - For British passport holders, only British citizens and British National (Overseas) enjoy visa-free entry.
2 - Except for French passports issued in New Caledonia.

60 days

Lesotho
Portugal
Russia
30 days

Albania
Andorra
Argentina
Bahrain
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Brunei
Cyprus
Egypt
Fiji
Guyana
Honduras
Kazakhstan
Kiribati
Marshall Islands
Mauritius
Micronesia
Monaco
Montenegro
Nauru
New Caledonia3
Oman
Palau
Paraguay
Qatar
Samoa
San Marino
Saudi Arabia
Seychelles
Solomon Islands
South Africa
Swaziland
Tonga
Tunisia
Tuvalu
  Vatican City
3 - For French passports issued in New Caledonia.

Special policy[edit]
If traveling by air to Jeju Island via Seoul, Busan, Cheongju, Muan and Yangyang, citizens of  China who are traveling as part of a tourist group with an authorized travel agent may stay in mainland South Korea for up to 5 days. They may remain in Jeju for 15 days.[1][2]

Non-ordinary passports[edit]
Holders of diplomatic, official or service passports of the following countries may enter without a visa:[1]

Algeria D O
Angola D O S
Armenia D O
Azerbaijan D O S
Bangladesh D O
Belarus D O S
Belize D O
Benin D O
Bolivia D O
Cambodia D O S
China D S
Indonesia D S
Iran D O S
Kyrgyzstan D O
Laos D O
Lebanon D O
Moldova D O S
Mongolia D O
Myanmar D O
Pakistan D O S
Philippines D S
Tajikistan D O
Turkmenistan D
Uzbekistan D
D: diplomatic passports
O: official passports
S: service passports

Holders of diplomatic, official or service passports of the following countries enjoy an extended length of stay when compared to ordinary passports:[1]

Austria: 180 days
Argentina: 90 days
Cyprus: 90 days
Egypt: 90 days
Kazakhstan: 90 days
Paraguay: 90 days
Russia: 90 days
In addition, holders of laissez-passers issued by the  United Nations are visa exempt for 30 days.[1]

Transit[edit]
In general, travelers in transit do not require a visa to transit through South Korea for less than 24 hours (for Incheon Airport) or when departing on the same calendar day (for all other airports) as long as they stay within the transit area.

Citizens of the following countries, however, must hold a Korean visa for transit:[1]

Sudan
Syria
The South Korean government has special visa waiver policies for passengers in transit, which are listed below.

Transit Tourism Program[edit]
Travelers who are in transit through Incheon International Airport can participate in an organized transit tour group within Seoul. The service is free but an entry-procedure fee of KRW 10,000 or USD 10 applies. The tour can be registered in advance or joined after the traveler's arrival, and the shortest tour lasts for an hour while the longest will not exceed 5 hours.[5]

Nationals of the following countries, as well as stateless persons and refugees, are not eligible for this service:[1]

Afghanistan
Cuba
Ghana
Iran
Iraq
Kosovo
Macedonia
Nigeria
Palestine
Sudan
Syria
30-day visa exemption[edit]
Non-visa-exempt nationals who are in transit through South Korea are visa-exempt for 30 days, provided holding a physical visa or a residence permit issued by the following countries and are arriving at South Korea from one of these countries and continuing to a third country, or arriving from a third country and continuing to one of these countries.[6][1]

Australia1
Canada
New Zealand
United States
1 - Holders of e-visas or e-resident permits are only permitted visa-free entry if they depart from Australia.

In addition, holders of China Chinese passports who also hold a physical visa or a residence permit issued by an EEA member state or Switzerland, or a group visa issued by Japan and traveling with the tour group, can also enjoy visa-free transit for 30 days.

This policy does not apply to the following nationalities:

Cuba
Iran
Macedonia
Sudan
Syria
Nationality evaluation[edit]
Under article 20 of Nationality Act, North Koreans and Sakhalin Koreans are eligible for the evaluation of nationality. The evaluation is used to determine whether one possesses South Korean nationality based on the Nationality Act of South Korea.[7]

As a part of the evaluation process, the applicant's personal history, family ties, migration history and current nationality (if any) will be examined by the Ministry of Justice. Successful applicants will be allowed to acquire South Korean nationality (in case of North Koreans) or have their South Korean nationality reinstated (for first-generation Sakhalin Koreans).[8] Descendants of first-generation Sakhalin Koreans may be eligible for South Korean nationality through either express naturalization or reinstatement.[9]

Jeju Island[edit]
All ordinary passport holders except the following can stay visa-free 30 days in Jeju Province.[10][1][11][2]

Afghanistan
Cuba
Ghana
Iran
Iraq
Kosovo
Macedonia
Nigeria
Palestine
Sudan
Syria
However, the above-mentioned nationalities are eligible if holding a Certificate of Invitation issued by Jeju Island Immigration Office, or have previous visited South Korea for 3 times since 1996 or once since 2006 while holding permanent residence permits issued by Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the United States.[1]

APEC Business Travel Card[edit]
Holders of passports issued by the following countries who possess an APEC Business Travel Card (ABTC) containing the "KOR" code on the reverse that it is valid for travel to South Korea can enter visa-free for business trips for up to 90 days.[1]

ABTCs are issued to nationals of:[12]

Australia
Brunei
Chile
China
Hong Kong
Indonesia
Japan
Malaysia
Mexico
New Zealand
Papua New Guinea
Peru
Philippines
Russia
Singapore
Taiwan
Thailand
Vietnam
South Korean visas[edit]
South Korea provides visas to cover various approved activities in country.

Working Holiday Visa (H-1)[edit]
The Working Holiday Visa (H-1) is issued to young-adult foreigners in some countries which have reciprocal agreements with South Korea. Holders are allowed to stay in the country for up to one year and engage in some employment activities as well as some educational activities. However, the main purpose of the trip is intended to be vacation. People between the ages of 18 and 25 or 30, depending on the country, are eligible for a South Korean working holiday visa. A working holiday visa holder cannot be employed in certain jobs such as receptionist, dancer, singer, musician, acrobat, or in places of entertainment where they may endanger good morals and manners.[13][14]

Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile[15]
Czech Republic
Denmark
France
Germany
Hong Kong
Hungary
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Mexico[16]
Netherlands
New Zealand
Poland[17]
Portugal
Sweden
Taiwan
United Kingdom
United States
Overseas Study (D-2) visa[edit]
The Overseas Study (D-2) visa is issued to a foreigner who are planning to study at the undergraduate or above level of school.[18]

Due to the high cost of education and difficulty in attracting foreign students the government considered granting special work visas to parents of students on D-2 visas in 2006. Parents would have been able to remain and work in the country for up to five years.[19] In the same year it was noted that foreign students often taught illegally to keep up with their finances. Immigration law allowed D-2 visa holders only to work part-time in some businesses which paid an average of 3000W per hour. Students were allowed to work only 20 hours per week. However, students could earn 30000-50000W per hour teaching languages as tutors.[20] In 2007 over 1800 foreigners on D-2 visas were found to be working illegally. Foreigners who have a D-2 visa are prohibited from working full-time.[21] 2009 saw concern raised over Chinese nationals who overstayed their visas. There was an 11.7 times increase in overstays on the D-2 and other visas. It was also reported that "a number" of those entering on D-2 visas from China were doing so only to find a job illegally.[22] In 2010 68 illegal tutors on D-2 visas were caught by the immigration department.[23]

Corporate Investment (D-8) visa[edit]
The Corporate Investment (D-8) visa is issued to foreigners who are going to own and manage a small or medium business in South Korea or who are sent as specialists to work at businesses owned by companies outside Korea. Individuals wishing to apply for this visa on their own must invest a minimum of 50 million won.[24][25]

The amount of money required as an investment by foreigners to obtain the visa has risen over the years. In 1991 a foreign investor was required to invest only 25 million won, then in 2001 this was raised to 50 million won. In 2010 the government announced that it was looking to increase this further to 100 million for a number of reasons. Due to inflation, a rise in the cost of living and other costs they felt that 100 million was more representative of what was required as a minimum investment to start a business in Korea. However, there was also concern that some foreigners were taking advantage of the visa and using it to reside permanently in Korea without actually creating any business. Once the visa has been issued the government doesn't keep track of the investment, so some foreigners were using agents who provided the investment money for a fee in order for them to obtain the visa. Concern was raised that the increase would do nothing to deter abuse of the visa and would instead discourage foreign investment in Korea.[26] The regulations surrounding the visa and foreign business ownership have been criticized for requiring a Korean guarantor even though the foreigner has invested a large sum of money and been given permission to open nearly any business they wish.[27]

Foreign Language teaching (E-2) visa[edit]
The Foreign Language teaching (E-2) visa is issued to foreign language teachers who work in South Korea. Applicants are required to be native residents of a country whose mother tongue is the same as the language they will teach and they are also required to hold a bachelor's degree from that country. Applications are required to submit criminal background checks, health checks, sealed transcripts, verified copies of their degree, contracts and a fee to obtain the visa.[28]

In 2007 the government introduced several new regulations to the E-2 visa. Included in these were a criminal record check, health check, and consulate/embassy interview for first-time applicants.[29] In 2008 several English-speaking countries that were disqualified from applying for the E-2 visa denounced it as discriminatory. The Philippines ambassador met with Korean Immigration officials to try to persuade them to change the policy and allow teachers from The Philippines to teach English in South Korea.[30] However, the government had already indicated earlier in the year that they planned to look at expanding E-2 visas to additional countries but it required the approval of various government agencies, so there was no timeframe for when it would come to fruition.[31] In the same year, foreign instructors already working in Korea also called the rules surrounding the visa discriminatory because they were subject to health criminal and other checks, unlike other foreigners on different visas, such as ethnic Koreans born abroad or foreigners who had married Koreans. Korean Immigration responded that it was their policy to favour ethnic Koreans and that other nations and territories followed similar policies.[32] Increasing crime was cited as a reason for the regulations, but some teachers felt it was a knee-jerk reaction to a suspected pedophile who had taught in South Korea, but never had a criminal record in the first place. Immigration again claimed the right to decide how and to whom it issued visas.[33] Later in 2009, a challenge was filed with the National Human Rights Commission in Korea over the checks by law professor Benjamin Wagner.[34]

Residency (F-2) visa[edit]
The Residency (F-2) visa is issued to spouses of Korean nationals or holders of the F-5 permanent residency visa. Applicants must provide documents proving financial ability and relationship.[35] The visa is also issued to refugees who gain permanent residence status in Korea.[36]

Concern was raised in 2008 that "unqualified foreigner teachers" were using F visas like the F-2 to gain employment in Korea.[37] The government passed a law in 2009 that would change the visas issued to government employees of foreign countries from E7 to F2.[38] In 2010 the government announced that foreigners who invested over US$500,000 on Jeju Island can also obtain an F-2 residency visa.[39] It was also announced in 2010 that foreigners already on certain visas would be given an opportunity to change their visa to an F-2 visa after meeting certain criteria and accruing a certain number of points.[40][41]

Visitor statistics[edit]
Most visitors arriving to South Korea were from the following countries of nationality:[42]

Country/Territory        2016        2015        2014        2013
China        Increase 8,067,722        Decrease 5,894,170        Increase 6,126,865        Increase 4,326,869
Japan        Increase 2,297,893        Decrease 1,837,782        Decrease 2,280,434        Decrease 2,747,750
United States        Increase 866,186        Decrease 767,613        Increase 770,305        Increase 722,315
Taiwan        Increase 833,465        Decrease 518,190        Increase 643,683        Decrease 544,662
Hong Kong        Increase 650,676        Decrease 523,427        Increase 558,377        Increase 400,435
Philippines        Increase 556,745        Decrease 403,622        Increase 434,951        Increase 400,786
Thailand        Increase 470,107        Decrease 371,769        Increase 466,783        Decrease 372,878
Malaysia        Increase 311,254        Decrease 223,350        Increase 244,520        Increase 207,727
Indonesia        Increase 295,461        Decrease 193,590        Increase 208,329        Increase 189,189
Vietnam        Increase 251,402        Increase 162,765        Increase 141,504        Increase 117,070
Total        Increase 17,241,823        Decrease 13,231,651        Increase 14,201,516        Increase 12,175,550

← End



[Title]
Visa policy of South Korea



  Important   175 →   Korean Visa types    
  174 →   D-9 VISA  
  173 →   D-8 VISA  
  164 →   사증발급매뉴얼 83-123  
  163 →   사증발급매뉴얼 67-83  
  162 →   사증발급매뉴얼 47-67  
  161 →   사증발급매뉴얼 13-46  
  156 →   Visa  

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[Category]


  • retainer fee
  • consulting fee
  • Resume of Attorney LEE
  • REFUGE, ASYLUM IN KOREA
  • Self Advocacy Statement for case
  • VISA IN KOREA
  • REMOVAL, DEPORTATION
  • B VISA
  • C VISA
  • D VISA
  • E VISA
  • F VISA
  • G VISA
  • H VISA
  • STAY, EXTENSION, CHANGE OF STATUS
  • PASSPORT OF KOREA
  • ADMISSION INSPECTION INTO KOREA
  • IMMIGRATION LAW OF KOREA
  • INVESTMENT IN KOREA
  • EMPLOYMENT IN KOREA
  • NATURALIZATION IN KOREA
  • MARRIAGE IN KOREA
  • 통역(translation, interpretation)
  • china visa
  • Death of Aliens, Estate, Proof of Death

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